Reasons People Gave for Attending Pitch Refinery

Following is a list of reasons attendees gave for desiding they needed to come to Pitch Refinery this weekend. Does any of this sound familiar to you? Join us!

  • The amount of time it takes for some responses to come back.

  • I’m still struggling to describe my unique services in a way that piques people’s interest.

  • Knowing how to properly describe what we do in a way that opens up dialogue

  • Making the initial approach without being offputting 

  • Engaging the most skeptical people in the audience

  • Finding my voice and being confident in my message.

  • tying into 1 big message

  • Finding out everything the prospect wants.

  • price and negotiation

  • being more concise when describing something completely new and organic (and derived from a pitch)

  • Fear

  • focus

  • Two things – being concise, and it seems like $ people just care about $.  I define success as how I’m helping/impacting others, not on my profit.  And I’ve got crazy great stories about the human element; but VCs, angel investors, etc. don’t seem to want to hear the fluffy stuff.

  • Learning not to over-explain.

  • Getting awareness with the right companies to pitch to.

  • I don’t have a good media list, I need more contacts, I reach out to editors, etc. and don’t get a response back. I’ve reached out to websites to review my products, and I don’t get a response back. It seems like I need an ‘in’, or that I’m simply doing something wrong.

  • Articulating what I do and it’s value.

  • Producing concise, written pitches in short order.

  • I am in the business of nuance and I often find it difficult to be as concise as I would like to be.

  • I’d like to get inside the head of investors more so I can understand them as an audience with needs that my pitch can serve.

  • providing too much technical information about the service

  • I get tongue-tied about what I do. 

  • Asking for money

  • Lack of practice

  • PUBLIC SPEAKING

  • Approaching the conversation in an engaging rather than salesy way.

  • Figuring out how much to ask for ask making the ask.  I’m great at building relationships, not as much asking for big $$

  • all around

  • ugh

  • I stumble over my words and don’t think quickly on my feet.  

  • Knowing what investors want and also need to memorize my pitch(es) based on the listener.

  • Not good at meeting and talking to new people.

  • I am working on an idea for a mobile app and struggle with how much I should be sharing in an elevator pitch since I am in the process of developing a prototype and there is little protectable about what I want to build from an intellectual property standpoint.   

  • Appearing confident in my delivery when I’m not confident in what I’m saying. 

  • how to do so in an intelligent and concise way and with confidence

  • My pain point is not to sound repetative. Additionally, to provide enough personalized client detail in a timely way to generate interest and in turn book business. 

  • Getting it all across succinctly.

  • Being nervous and stepping over my own words. 

  • Maintaining confidence in the face of questions or criticism.

  • I get nervous, speak fast and ramble when in front of others! 

  • Making sure the audience receiving the pitch is a captive and receptive one!

  • Cutting through organizational bureaucracy and friction. Organizational manipulation.

  • providing too much technical information about the service

  • providing too much technical information about the service

  • Nerves

  • Lack of practice

Attendees are going to learn about how to tackle all these things and more this weekend. We’ll keep you updated!